The Very Model

Oh my. Apparently I’ve several months to apologize for. Well, I am sorry, dear readers [both of you *chuckle*] for having been away so very long. Many adventures have been had and I have survived each and every one, both good and bad. And soon I shall be off on another. But this evening I am here.

Anyone who actually knows me also knows that I collect uniforms, particularly those with a vintage appearance, and I wear them in public. There are a variety of uniforms available to the Neo-Victorian man: military, police, fireman and more. So is there truth to the saying that “women adore a man in uniform”?

My research has shown that it is mostly true. While there are those ladies who apparently do not find a uniform to be appealing or to be an addition which increases the attractiveness of a man there are more who do. Were I to roughly guess the ratio I would put it at around two-thirds finding a uniformed man more attractive.

Here are eight reasons which were offered by an author and a lady:

A man in a uniform knows how to look after himself. (Who wants to be some guy’s mother?)
A man in a uniform knows how to bathe, shave, and dress himself (I’m not saying the rest of you don’t . . .).
A dress uniform is flattering to the male figure (Ooh-YAH!).
An officer is a gentleman (or at least has really good tablemanners).
The whole demeanor of a man in dress blues, or whites, or whatever is confident and dependable. Very Sexy.
Since a man in uniform knows all about responsibility and duty, he could well be counted on to take out the garbage. Theoretically, at least.
Any military unit that has had to serve in a combat zone anywhere in the world (yep–even in Norn Irn) comes back changed. These men (if not too deeply disturbed by their experiences) (and my heart goes out to all vets of any combat anywhere who go home broken, either physically or mentally) know the value of a sunset. Or a sunrise.
Other uniforms, not just military, work just as well, if the training behind the spit and polish is as extensive. Who is more welcome at an accident scene that a paramedic or a fireman? Women know that they will be rescued by these substitutions for knights in shining armor.

The uniformed man is presented as our ‘modern’ knight in shining armour. Oft the ladies also mention his fitness, his attractive shape and muscular form. There is described a ‘safety’ feeling or a knowledge that a man in uniform will protect a lady or, if she needs, rescue her. And there are wanderings into Mr. Darwin’s realm supposing that a lady looks for the best provider, the alpha male, and that those in uniforms are obviously that sort.

Let us look at the uniform first, shall we?

Beginning with the tunic, that most important part of a uniform ensemble, I have oft stated that a properly fitted military jacket is to a man much as a corset is to a woman: if forces the shoulders back, the spine straight, the chest out and the stomach in. The high collar keeps one’s head up to enhance the posture. The colours of the Victorian military man were often fairly bright and flashy due to a need to see the troops through the fog of war [also known as the dark power smoke of fired weapons] and thus reds, blues, yellows and greens were all popular. Add in trim of gold, silver or copper and other shiny accessories along with dark leather belts and one has an eye catching outfit. During the Victorian era the officers had their own uniforms tailored specifically which, as anyone knows, enhances the appearance, the drape, the fit of a garment.

The pants are usually creased and without pleats, fitting snugly to the waist, thighs and legs. This can make a man look taller than he is, particularly from a distance. Stripes to match or complement the tunic colour also help gain one notice. Generally speaking the pants also did not have pockets which means no unsightly bulges from wallets, keys or what have you. Necessaries were carried in pouches on the belt.

For an officer, in particular, high boots brightly polished and well fitted were necessary. Once again this creates a longer and leaner look of the body. And boots have that particular sound on hard surfaces, a sound that brings many of us back to our fathers, to parades, to marching. It is a strong and aggressive sound.

Add in gloves of snug leather and the appropriate hat and one is set. A uniformed man must know all about hat etiquette which his a showy practice in itself.

Military fashion has oft and long influenced the fashions of civilians. Men’s facial hair has oft been dictated by veterans in an attempt to look more like those who have returned from ‘doing their duty for Queen and country.’ During the Victorian era lady’s riding outfits were very militaristic in cut, buttons and accessories oft including a pelisse for cooler weather, gloves and hat of a distinctly uniform look.

The suit of this modern age owes much to the uniforms of the past as many women will admit that a man looks better in a well tailored suit, and a proper suit is a form of uniform for the working man. Naturally I prefer a three piece suit with waistcoat but even a two piece can, if properly fitted, add to a gentleman’s attractiveness.

Speaking for my self and my self only there is something about putting on a good suit or, particularly, a uniform. The snugness of the clothing which requires that I stand straight in good posture, the many buttons requiring individual attention all shining brightly, pulling on the boots, ensuring that each piece is as it should be: in good state, clean and sharp; all together it adds to my self confidence. A uniform is not a quick to throw on outfit and takes attention and care to ensure that each piece is properly set which means I must attend to my self and my appearance in detail. Together, once that last button is done up and my throat clasp is closed, I walk taller and feel more in control of my own world and self.

There are patterns about for uniforms though they can be difficult to find at times. Military surplus stores sometimes offer vintage uniforms or outfits of a vintage appearance though do shop around for the best price as some stores set a very high value on such things. For daily wear worry not if a uniform is authentic or a reproduction as both will look excellent and only the ‘experts’ truly care.

In conclusion I must say that to any Steampunk gentleman or Victorian re-enactor a good uniform is a must have for the wardrobe.

Here is hoping that I am not so tardy in my next posting.

H.A. Higgins-Keith